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15 Books You Must Read If You Love Hindu Mythology

Hindu mythology is full of rich and intriguing stories. Some adventurous writers managed to amalgamate the old manuscripts with their art of storytelling to come with some seriously interesting religious history keeping the facts intact to it.

If you are one of those bibliophiles, who possess the love for fiction merged with unusual yet interesting takes in Mythological origin then we have a list that is just perfect for you. Some of the exceptionally creative and daring authors have merged their imagination with mythology and presented the best ever fiction you could ever read.

#1 The Mahabharata Secret by Christopher C. Doyle

The Mahabharata Secret by Christopher C. Doyle
The Mahabharata Secret by Christopher C. Doyle

The Mahabharata Secret takes you back and forth during the times of Ashoka 244 BC and present. A story where a nephew of a retired scientist and his friend goes on a journey to find a secret. A secret which people would kill to keep.

Get your copy, here.

#2 The Krishna Key by Ashwin Sanghi

The Krishna Key by Ashwin Sanghi
The Krishna Key by Ashwin Sanghi

The Krishna Key is definitely a page-turner. It is a story of a boy who grew up believing that he is the final avatar of Lord Krishna. It was believed that Krishna would return in a new avatar when the need arises, which is in the eventually Kaliyug—The Dark Age.

Get your copy, here.

#3 The Immortals Of Meluha by Amish Tripathi

The Shiva Trilogy by Amish Tripathi
The Shiva Trilogy by Amish Tripathi

Ever imagined Lord Shiva came to life in present era? The answer to your curiosity lies in these three books.The Immortals of Meluha is the first novel of the Shiva trilogy series by Amish Tripathi. The other two books of the series are The Secrets of Nagas and The Oath of Vayaputras.

Get your copy, here.

#4 The Pregnant King by Devdutt Pattanaik

The Pregnant King by Devdutt Pattanaik 
The Pregnant King by Devdutt Pattanaik

There are many characters in the Mahabharata that are hardly discussed. One such character is Shilavati, who cannot be a king because she’s a woman. The Pregnant King is her story. Devdutt Pattanaik creates a lush and fecund work of fiction in which the lines are continually blurred between men and women, sons and daughters.

Get your copy, here.

#5 Ajaya Trilogy by Anand Neelakantan

Ajaya Trilogy by Anand Neelakantan
Ajaya Trilogy by Anand Neelakantan

Ajaya Trilogy is Mahabharata written from the point of view of the Kauravas. This in itself makes it a very intriguing concept. Ajaya is the narrative of the ‘unconquerable’ Kauravas, who were decimated to the last man. Only the first two parts have been released to date: Ajaya: Roll of the Dice and Rise of Kali: Duryodhana’s Mahabharata.

Get your copy, here.

#6 Asura: The Tale of the Vanquished by Anand Neelakantan

Asura: The Tale of the Vanquished by Anand Neelakantan
Asura: The Tale of the Vanquished by Anand Neelakantan

Ever imagined Ramayana from Raavan’s point of view? Asura is written from the point of view of the biggest antagonist that Hindu mythology has ever had.

An excerpt from the Asura reads, “You have heard the victor’s tale, the Ramayana. Now hear the Ravanayana, for I am Ravana, the Asura, and my story is the tale of the vanquished.”

Get your copy, here.

#7 Jaya by Devdutt Pattanaik

Jaya by Devdutt Pattanaik
Jaya by Devdutt Pattanaik

Jaya is an enthralling retelling of India’s greatest epic, the Mahabharata. Mahabharata in its comprehensive form, with over 250 illustrations and all the related folk tales with minute details that perk up your interest in the epic, like a never-before manner.

Get your copy, here.

#8 The Taj Conspiracy by Manreet Sodhi Someshwar

The Taj Conspiracy by Manreet Sodhi Someshwar
The Taj Conspiracy by Manreet Sodhi Someshwar

This is a first in the Mehrunisa series by the author and follows the plot of how she accidentally stumbles upon a conspiracy to destroy the Taj Mahal from radicals who claim that it was a Hindu temple instead.

Get your copy, here.

#9 The Palace of Illusions by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni

The Palace of Illusions by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni
The Palace of Illusions by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni

The Palace of Illusions is an exquisite blend of fiction and facts. It takes us to a land that is part history, part myth but absolutely magical. Narrated by Panchaali, the wife of the legendary Pandava brothers in the Mahabharata, the novel gives us an entirely new interpretation of the greatest epic of all time.

Get your copy, here.

#10 The Aryavarta Chronicles by Krishna Udayasankar

The Aryavarta Chronicles by Krishna Udayasankar
The Aryavarta Chronicles by Krishna Udayasankar

This too is a different take on Mahabharata. Much like The Shiva Trilogy, the author retells the epic after removing all the supernatural elements of the tale, keeping Govinda undeniably and heartwarmingly human.

Get your copy, here.

#11 The Rozabal Line by Shawn Higgings

The Rozabal Line by Shawn Higgings
The Rozabal Line by Shawn Higgings

The Rozabal Line is Ashwin Sanghi’s debut novel under a pseudonym, is heavily inspired by The Da Vinci Code. Following the trail and lineage of Jesus Christ, this too is a very interesting read, if you enjoyed the former.

Get your copy, here.

#12 Chanakya’s Chant by Ashwin Sanghi

The Chanakya’s Chant by Ashwin Sanghi
The Chanakya’s Chant by Ashwin Sanghi

Chanakya’s Chant is yet another historical spine-chiller by Ashwin Sanghvi, a political thriller set in two different ages – in ancient Bharat & in the present day. This too flows between past and present, with Chanakya and Chandragupta forming the past half.

Get your copy, here.

#13 Arjuna: Saga of a Pandava Warrior-Prince by Anuja Chandramouli

Arjuna by Anuja Chandramouli
Arjuna by Anuja Chandramouli

Arjuna: Saga of a Pandava Warrior-Prince is quite unique as we have not yet heard of Arjun’s Mahabharata. Mahabharata has been the most interesting epic, if one considers religious works, and so, there have been many creative variants, from various’ character’s points of views, to give us an insight on each of them.

Get your copy, here.

#14 The Treasure of Kafur by Aroon Raman

The Treasure of Kafur by Aroon Raman
The Treasure of Kafur by Aroon Raman

A riveting saga of action and adventure set in Mughal India, this is a purely historical fiction. With a heavy dose of plots and mystery thrown in, this too is quite spellbinding, once you get the hang of reading about 1580 AD.

Get your copy, here.

#15 Karna’s wife: The Outcast’s Queen by Kavita Kane

Karna’s wife: The Outcast's Queen by Kavita Kane
Karna’s wife: The Outcast’s Queen by Kavita Kane

Karna’s wife: The Outcast’s QueenThe Outcast’s Queen tells the story of Karna, who is often called the unsung hero of the Mahabharata, through the eyes of his wife Uruvi. The story of Uruvi and Karna unravels against the backdrop of the unpleasantness between the Pandavas and the Kauravas. You will be amazed by the imagination of the author.

Get your copy, here.


All of these books are worth making it to your must-read list. Read and lose yourself in the world of magic, powers, Gods, and a lot more. We know you are scribbling it all down, and rushing to the bookstores, online and offline alike, to make these a part of your collection. Go get these.

Is there something you want to add to this list? Let us know in the comments below! 

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